10 Super Easy Types of Echeveria That You'll Love

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by Max - last update on June 14, 2020, 9:14 am
Types of Echeveria

Echeveria are evergreen succulents that thrive in hot and dry climates or can be grown as houseplants. They are native to Mexico and Central and South America and are available in a wide selection of varieties and cultivars. All echeveria produce fleshy foliage in a rosette form, though their leaf color and shape can vary dramatically between types. They are easy to care for, and many produce attractive flowers. This list comprises some of the best types of echeveria.

1. Mexican Snowball

Mexican Snowball

Scientific Name: Echeveria elegans

Mature Size: Up to 8 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Flower Color: Pink and yellow

This native Mexican evergreen succulent produces a dense carpet of tightly packed rosettes, as it sends out offsets over time. The rosettes are formed from fleshy foliage that is a pale gray-green. Each leaf is rounded and cupped into a spoon shape, with a matte, almost velvety texture. Foliage can be tipped with flushes of red to give a contrasting two-tone look. In spring and winter, these plants can send out tall, vertical red stems, held high above the foliage at around one foot in height.

Each stem will produce a lantern-like pink bloom with yellow edges. These plants need a consistently warm, dry environment, but can be kept as houseplants in any climate. When kept as a houseplant, these echeverias will rarely flower. They are commonly used as ground cover in hot climates, and also work well in rock gardens or container planting. This succulent needs little water and is drought-tolerant. It should not be watered at all during its dormant period. It is easy to grow and has received the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society.


2. Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Scientific Name: Echeveria derenbergii

Mature Size: Up to 4 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low water needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Flower Color: Yellow and orange

This evergreen succulent is native to Mexico. It produces tight rosettes that each measure around three inches across. The foliage has a soft texture and a blue-gray color, with each leaf taking the form of a fleshy triangle. The plant blooms in late winter to late spring, typically when grown outside. Flowers arise on long pink stems that are adorned with a handful of pretty flowers. The flowers extend several inches outside of the rosettes and are cup-shaped in a shade of medium pink with orange-tipped petals. These plants produce offsets easily and will gather to form a dense carpet of foliage. They work well as ground cover in hot climates or can be grown as houseplants in any region. They are drought-tolerant but perform best with occasional watering.


3. Painted Echeveria

Painted Echeveria

Scientific Name: Echeveria nodulosa

Mature Size: Up to 2 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, loamy

Flower Color: Yellow and pink

This evergreen succulent produces rosettes formed from fleshy, concave leaves, which come to a rounded point at the tip. They are green with purple-red markings and make for a strikingly colorful foliage plant in the garden. The rosettes can measure up to five inches across, and they readily produce offsets that can create the look of a dense carpet. This plant will typically spread to cover around three feet of soil in the right conditions. In summer, a flower spike will rise above the foliage to a height of around two feet. The spike will be covered in tiny yellow blooms that have flushes of pink. This plant is native to Mexico and requires well-draining soil and plenty of light. When kept as a houseplant, it will perform best in bright light, whereas outside its best lighting position will depend on the climate. In very hot temperatures, this succulent will fare best when given some afternoon shade. It is drought-tolerant but prefers to be watered fairly regularly during the summer months.


4. Topsy Turvy

Topsy Turvy

Scientific Name: Echeveria runyonii' Topsy Turvy'

Mature Size: Up to one foot tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Flower Color: Orange and yellow

This Mexico native succulent has unusual leaves that, as you might expect from the name, twist, and turn in an unlikely manner. Each leaf has the shape of a stretched spoon and then flicks upwards at its tip as if reaching towards the sun. The edges of the leaf along its lengths are then curled underneath, giving the plant a whimsical style. The foliage is a pale blue-green, has a powdery texture, and forms a rosette shape that can grow to a width of four inches. The plant easily produces offsets that create a dense, waxy carpet if allowed to continue to spread. For this reason, the plant is commonly used as ground cover or in rock gardens and container planting. In summer, the plant will produce stems that gently arch over, with drooping star-shaped flowers at their tips. The flowers are orange and yellow and are held at the height of around eight inches. This plant has been the recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society. It propagates easily from leaf cuttings or can be divided when mature.


5. Arlie Wright

Arlie Wright

Credit to The Ruth Bancroft Garden

Scientific Name: Echeveria' Arlie Wright'

Mature Size: Up to 4 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Flower Color: Pink

This echeveria hybrid was created in the mid-1960s by Dick Wright, and named after his mother. It has been naturalized in Texas, Mexico, and in regions around Central and South America. It is loved for its heavily ruffled foliage that changes color at different times of the year. Each leaf is the shape of a wide semi-circle and is fairly flat but for the abundant ruffles along its outer, curving edge. Leaves can range from shades of coral, through to green, and tan bronze, and will vary depending on the amount of sunlight the plant receives, as well as the season. The foliage is very decorative and forms a rosette shape. From the center of the rosette, a tall flower spike can emerge from that small, star-shaped, pink blooms dangle. This plant is heat-tolerant and drought-tolerant once established; however, it would prefer regular water. For the best color, allow the plant full sun in the morning and give it a few hours of shade in the afternoon. When kept as a houseplant, it will need consistent bright light.


6. Lipstick

Lipstick

Scientific Name: Echeveria agavoides' Lipstick'

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Flower Color: Red and yellow

This evergreen succulent is native to Mexico. It produces eye-catching rosettes of sharp-pointed leaves, which have a green base color but flaming red tips and margins. The red-orange foliage is so vibrant and showy that it looks as though it could have been spray-painted on. The leaves are fleshy, and each one has a spine at the tip. The plant flowers throughout spring, producing a tall spike from that red flowers with yellow flushed petals emerge. As is common with echeverias, this plant freely produces offsets, though it will not typically spread to create a carpet. Instead, the baby rosettes cling to the side of the mother rosette, almost creating a frame for the original plant. This plant propagates easily from stem cuttings or can be divided every two to three years. It will thrive in full sun or partial shade but will have the most vibrant coloring when it is grown in all-day light.


7. Ghost Echeveria

Ghost Echeveria

Scientific Name: Echeveria lilacina

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Flower Color: Orange-pink

This unusual-looking succulent is grown for its interesting coloring. It produces rosettes of waxy, fleshy foliage, which have a gray-lilac color. In full sun, the leaves will have a hint of coral coloring. The rosettes have a relatively flat shape and can measure up to ten inches across. Each leaf is a plump spoon-shape that comes to a definite point. Towards late winter, this plant will bloom by producing gently arching stems from that pink-orange flowers emerge. This variety of echeveria usually does not produce offsets, and instead remains as a solitary specimen. It works well as part of a rock garden display or in a container alongside other succulents. It has received the Award of Garden Merit for the Royal Horticultural Society for its noteworthy characteristics. It needs well-draining soil that will prevent water from collecting around the plant's roots.


8. Black Prince

Black Prince

Scientific Name: Echeveria 'Black Prince'

Mature Size: Up to 10 inches

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy,

Flower Color: Red

This succulent produces densely packed rosettes in a rich shade of burgundy that can look almost black in low light. The outer leaves of the rosette are the darkest, gradually fading inwards until they become bright green in the center. Rosettes typically measure three inches across at maturity and are made up of pointed, triangular leaves. The leaves are waxy and fleshy and contrast well against other plants. At the end of the growing season, the plant produces tall stems that are held high above the rosettes. These stems develop clusters of striking red flowers, which give the plant an even more dramatic look. This plant produces offsets easily and makes a lovely display in a container filled with the mother plant and a crowd of smaller offsets. It is drought-tolerant when mature, but thrives in moderately moist soil.


9. Lady Aquarius

Scientific Name: Echeveria' Lady Aquarius'

Mature Size: Up to 8 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, loamy

Flower Color: Orange

This echeveria produces large rosettes that typically measure around eight inches across. The leaves are large and paddle-shaped, with delicate ruffles all along their edges. The leaves are predominantly a powder blue-green color, but the ruffled margins are a pretty shade of pink. These two colors contrast nicely and give the plant a soft and feminine look. The plant produces flower stalks with clusters of orange-pink blooms. It thrives in heat once mature, but in very hot climates should be provided with some shade in the afternoon when the sun is at its most intense. It needs enough light to maintain its vivid coloring, but not so much that the leaves scorch. It is also drought-tolerant once established but performs best in soils where medium moisture is maintained.


10. Blue Echeveria

Blue Echeveria

Scientific Name: Echeveria secunda

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-12

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Flower Color: Red and yellow

This evergreen succulent is native to Mexico and is notable for its vivid blue foliage. It produces flat rosettes that are full and tightly packed with rounded leaves that come to a tiny point at the tip. The leaves are not as chunky as most echeveria plants, and therefore they seem to cram more individual leaves onto each rosette. The rosettes typically measure around six inches across and will send out offsets easily to produce a mass of blue leafy carpet over time. The plant produces arched flower stems in the summer, from that bi-colored red and yellow flowers hang. The flower stems can reach up to one foot in height, sitting high above the rosettes below. This plant is drought-tolerant once established but will thrive with occasional watering and soil that is not allowed to completely dry out.

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