11 Different Varieties of Eucalyptus Trees

Profile picture for user Max
by Max - last update on May 14, 2020, 8:41 am
Types of Eucalyptus Trees

Eucalyptus trees have a stunning architectural look to them, with unusually shaped branches which sometimes have a twisting habit, or are covered with colorful, patterned bark. These trees are easy to care for and have a long life span; many are drought-tolerant and can cope with a wide range of soils. They are rarely the victim of pests and require little to no maintenance.

These trees are predominantly native to Australia, though there are a few exceptions. Though they are accustomed to warm climates, there are a few types of eucalyptus that are cold hardy and can tolerate low temperatures, frost, and even snow, making them accessible for people to grow in a wide range of climates. Eucalyptus trees are evergreen, providing interest in the landscape all year round. They are typically quite fast-growing and can range in size from small trees or shrubs to extremely large trees reaching over 200 feet in height. To discover more and learn about some of the most popular types of eucalyptus trees, check out our following list.

11 Types of Eucalyptus Trees

1. Argyle Apple

Argyle Apple

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus cinerea

Mature Size: Up to 50 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-11

Light: Full sun

Water: Low water needs

Soil: Well-draining

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Drought tolerant

This eucalyptus tree is native to southeastern Australia. It is also commonly known as the silver dollar tree because it has silvery blue-green leaves that are round when young, giving them the look of big silver coins. When they take this shape, they are commonly used as decorative foliage in cut flower bouquets and floral decorations. As they mature, the leaves become elongated and narrow and develop into a deep green color.

This evergreen tree has a long life expectancy, with good tolerance of drought and exposure to high winds. It has an attractive red-brown bark, which gives the tree an ornamental quality. This eucalyptus has a rounded growth habit, and during spring, it produces an abundance of clustered blossoms amongst its foliage. It grows best in hot climates but can be grown in cooler regions in a container that will need to be brought indoors over winter. A container will greatly reduce the tree's expected height. This tree thrives in moist soil, but it will tolerate sustained periods of drought with no noticeable damage to the plant.


2. Rainbow Gum

Rainbow Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus deglupta

Mature Size: Up to 240 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10-11

Light: Full sun

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Flower Color: White, yellow

Special Features: Multi-colored rainbow bark

It’s not hard to see where this tree gets its common name from, as the summer bark looks as though it has been painted in an array of rainbow watercolors. The usual bark is orange-brown with a smooth texture, but this then peels off throughout summer to uncover a series of random multicolored streaks. Due to its beautiful bark, it is widely planted as an ornamental tree, but it is also mass cultivated for the production of pulp to make white paper. The rainbow gum tree is the only type of eucalyptus tree that grows natively in the northern hemisphere and is the only eucalyptus tree that grows in a rainforest habitat.

The tree is native to Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The tree has lance-shaped foliage and produces white and yellow blossoms at various points throughout the year, depending on its location.


3. Mountain Gum

Mountain Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus dalrympleana

Mature Size: Up to 70 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10

Light: Full sun

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, acidic

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Award winner

This fast-growing eucalyptus tree is native to Australia. Its defining feature is its smooth creamy white and gray bark, which flakes off periodically. The ovate foliage of this tree is copper-green when young, but matures into a deep blue-green, and has a dropping style. The tree has a distinctive eucalyptus scent, with subtle hints of cinnamon.

Clusters of white blossoms appear amongst the foliage in summer, often with a second bloom in fall. This tree grows well in full sun or partial shade and has a long life expectancy. It has received the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society (Royal Horticultural Society).


4. Tasmanian Snow Gum

Tasmanian Snow Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus coccifera

Mature Size: Up to 50 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 7-10

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Fertile, acidic,

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Peppermint scented

This stunning tree is native to Tasmania, hence its common name. It has beautifully elegant bark, which is smooth and colorful. The bark has a marbled effect with long streaks of gray, cream, and pink, stretching across the twisted branches. The foliage of this tree hangs from bright red stems and is heart-shaped when young but develops into a lance shape when mature. The leaves have a sweet peppermint fragrance, which is amplified when they are crushed between fingers. This tree is able to withstand exposed conditions, and it is also quite tolerant of frost, and drought, though it would prefer moist soil. It produces small creamy white blossoms in clusters throughout summer.


5. Snow Gum

Snow Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus pauciflora

Mature Size: Up to 50 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-11

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Acidic, fertile

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Twisting branches

This eucalyptus tree has elegantly twisted branches that are covered in highly ornamental bark. The bark is creamy-gray but peels away in narrow strips to reveal smooth orange or green patches. New growth on the tree appears in bright red, which makes the tree very colorful when taken as a whole. The foliage has a glossy texture and is gray-green. The leaves have a fresh eucalyptus scent and provide the backdrop for clusters of white flowers that are produced through spring and summer.

This tree should be planted in a sheltered position to protect it from drying winds. It will grow best in moist soil, though it is tolerant of drought. This tree will grow in a wide range of climates as it can tolerate both hot and cold temperatures.


6. Alpine Snow Gum

Alpine Snow Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus pauciflora subspecies niphophila

Mature Size: Up to 25 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 7-10

Light: Full sun

Water: Low to average water needs

Soil: Acidic, well-draining

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Award winner

This plant, native to southeastern Australia, is small for a eucalyptus tree and can take the form of a small tree or a large shrub, typically growing to between 10 and 25 feet in height. Its gently twisting branches are covered in smooth gray-brown bark, which peels away in long ribbons to reveal stretches of green. The foliage is blue-green when it emerges, but transforms to a glossy gray-green in adulthood. Summer sees large clusters of frilly white flowers arrive on the plant, which can have a fluffy aesthetic.

This tree is drought-tolerant, though it does prefer moist soil. It requires well-draining soil as it will not survive in boggy conditions. It is a good choice for coastal planting as it fares well in windy conditions and is tolerant of salt. This tree may struggle with low temperatures when young, though once established, it is more able to cope with a variety of climate conditions.


7. Candlebark

Candlebark

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus rubida

Mature Size: Up to 100 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 7-10

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining, fertile

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Cold hardy

This tree can be medium or large in size, having a mature height of anywhere between 30 and 100 feet. The bark of the tree is smooth and creamy, which peels off in ribbons colored in various shades of pink, orange, and brown. Young foliage on the tree is round in shape, with a blue-gray color. These young stems and leaves are popularly used in bouquets and floral decorations, though as the foliage matures, it becomes long, narrow, and green-blue.

This tree is one of the hardiest types of eucalyptus, being suitable for growing down to USDA hardiness zone 7, and can tolerate snow and heavy frost.


8. Jounama Snow Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus pauciflora subspecies debeuzevillei

Mature Size: Up to 30 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-11

Light: Full sun

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Fertile, well-draining

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Award winner

This Australian native is a small to medium-sized tree with an open habit. It can have one or several main stems. The bark of this tree is pale brown and peels off in narrow strips to reveal patches of green, gray, white, and cream. The foliage of the tree is large, silver-green, and has a broadly ovate shape. Blossoms appear in clusters among the foliage in summer, in creamy white.

This is a hardy eucalyptus that can tolerate low temperatures, and it also fares well in exposed conditions in coastal locations. It prefers moist soil though it can tolerate drought. The tree has been the recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society.


9. Spinning Gum

Spinning Gum

Credit to David Hawgood

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus perriniana

Mature Size: Up to 30 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Acidic

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Mint scented

This Australian native takes the shape of a large shrub or a small tree, typically growing to between 20 and 30 feet in height. The plant has a spreading habit, sometimes becoming as wide as it is tall. The gray-brown bark peels away in ribbons to reveal patches of green, white, and gray. The young foliage of the tree is popular among florists as it has an attractive rounded shape. The leaves also give off a sweet fragrance, reminiscent of mint.

Though best grown in full sun, this eucalyptus can adjust to a position of partial shade and will tolerate a range of poor soils.


10. Narrow-leaved Peppermint

Narrow-leaved Peppermint

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus nicholii

Mature Size: Up to 50 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Average, well-draining

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Peppermint scented

The narrow-leaved peppermint tree is named after its slender leaves and the peppermint fragrance they give off when crushed. The tree is native to eastern Australia, though it is now commonly cultivated in the western United States, including California. It has a vigorous growth habit with upward reaching branches. It typically has a slender silhouette, which is enhanced by its narrow draping foliage, which dangles elegantly from bright red stems.

Clusters of white flowers adorn this tree from summer right through to fall. The tree is drought-tolerant and should be watered conservatively. It will not fare well in wet or soggy soil.


11. Cider Gum

Cider Gum

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus gunnii

Mature Size: Up to 70 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Low to average moisture needs

Soil: Acidic, fertile

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Award winner

This upright tree is one of the fastest growing among all eucalyptus, with a final height of between 30 and 70 feet. It takes a conical shape, looking like a stretched, tall pyramid. It is densely branched with masses of closely packed foliage to create a thick canopy of leaves. When young, the foliage is rounded and silver when it is popularly used among florists for cut flower bouquets and other floral arrangements. As the leaves age, they take on a lance shape and develop into a blue-green color.

The bark of the tree has a smooth texture, and flakes away in large pieces to reveal pink-brown patches. The tree is drought-tolerant and does not require much water to thrive. It prefers fertile soil, though it will tolerate average soils. It has been awarded the Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society.

11 Different Varieties of Eucalyptus Trees

Add new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Back to top